Daredevil Plot Turns on CastScore

DAREDEVIL SEASON 3 SPOILER ALERT

As season three of Daredevil explodes onto Netflix and sucks us all into the now familiar Marvel drama fest of nocturnal super-hero action, fight scenes, intrigue and love interest, I have to say I have been side-tracked a little by the brand new character of FBI Special Agent Ray Nadeem.

When we first meet Ray at his son Sammy’s birthday party, we find out the Nadeem family are in the midst of a family financial crisis. His wife Seema has had all her credit cards declined. Ray’s brother’s wife has cancer and their insurance has stopped paying for treatment. Ray and Seema have stepped in and helped cover their sister-in-law’s medical expenses. And now they are in debt.

Overwhelmed by the financial pressure, Ray asks for a raise at work and is denied. His boss tells him his low FICO score has put him out of consideration for promotion as he poses a bribery risk.

Instead, the agent is assigned the task of visiting arch villain Wilson Fisk in prison to elicit co-operation with ongoing investigations. Needless to say, it looks like Ray’s course is set on a slippery slope into well … bribery and corruption.

Not being a character in the original Marvel universe, purists may not embrace Agent Ray Nadeem as quickly as I have. But I have to confess to an ulterior motive. I’m drawn to Ray because he’s a character in the everyday universe of the world I live in too.

Financially Overstretched

He’s financially overstretched himself but he has done so with the very best of intentions. All he needed was a timely promotion, a window of time to pay off his debt, his sister in law to respond to treatment and all would have been well with his world. He would have had a routine visit to Fisk in prison and returned to his desk for a sandwich. Admittedly, this would be seriously bad TV, but in the real world, personal disaster would have been averted.

The plot all turned on a FICO score which just showed Agent Ray was in debt, not why or how likely he was to be able to repay it.

It was for people like Ray that Castlight recently launched the world’s first open-banking affordability score, providing people with a whole new way of demonstrating their creditworthiness.

Traditional credit scoring focuses on the consumer’s future credit behaviour being similar to their past performance.

CastScore, by contrast uses open-banking technology to analyse a customer’s transactional data in real time and score their likelihood of paying credit back. The AI that powers the CastScore technology has been validated on actual loan performance data, supplemented by expert analysis of spending trends with high street banks. CastScore then merges this information with transaction analytics, sourced from an up-to-the-minute review of the customer’s actual income and spend as well as a more complex analysis of lifestyle and discretionary spending.

“Redemptive” Technology

CastScore looks at and categorises every debit and credit, filling in the gaps in traditional credit data reporting and provides a 3D movie of an individual’s financial story. It gives people a chance to be fairly assessed. And it is a “redemptive” technology which allows people to make mistakes, recover from them and get back on track.

If CastScore had been checked with Agent Ray Nadeem’s FICO score, it would have shown that Ray had a good regular job, that he had a history of fulfilling credit commitments and that he had hit a blip. It would run Ray’s transactional data through financial insights and behaviour software and provide a lender with a score which reflected Ray’s 3D financial profile and the statistical likelihood of him being able to pay off his debts.

It could very easily have given him a score that would have reassured his boss, secured him the promotion and changed the world of Marvel forever.

Traditional Banks Have a Head Start in the Open Banking Space

The banks are in the media spotlight just now as open banking starts to roll out and the debate gathers steam. Are the banks ready? How are they faring in the brand new open banking space where everyone is jostling for room? Read more

Open Banking And A Light Bulb Moment

When new technology bursts onto the scene it is almost always received in two different ways, by two different camps of people – those who are excited by the new opportunities it opens up and those who are resistant to change. Read more

Open Banking – Giving Consumers Control of their Finances

Where we stand today the Big Four Banks have more than 70% of the personal current account market and 85% of the business current account market. I’m sure most people would agree that there’s room for some competition in this market. In pretty much every area of life, the more competition there is, the better it is for the consumer. Read more

The Bank of Mum and Dad Ends Tomorrow

Last week, it was reported in the press that British parents will lend or give more than £6.5 billion this year to help their children buy their first home. This figure is up from £5 billion in 2016. And it seems that the phenomenon is here to stay. It already has its own acronym. BOMAD. The Bank of Mum and Dad. Read more

It’s Time for the Banks to Play Catch Up

This month, Facebook launched Messenger Day, a feature that lets you post pictures and videos with a 24 hour shelf life. Snapchat may have got in there first with the broad concept, but Facebook has given it a twist by formatting the feature to encourage users to get together offline. A billion people worldwide use Messenger and Facebook has identified a way to deliver additional value to them. Read more

PSD2 is Speeding up the Tracks

On Saturday afternoon’s The Bottom Line on Radio 4, Evan Davis asked Anthony Jenkins, former CEO of Barclay’s Bank, what he thought the next big thing in banking would be. Jenkins replied: “In the very short term I think the better use of data to make lending and credit decisions and marketing decisions.”

Of course I couldn’t agree more, as this is exactly what we are already doing with The Affordability Passport. Read more

New Dimensions for Astronauts and Banking

Hidden Figures, in cinemas now, is the story of Katherine G Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson, three female African-American mathematicians, or “computers”, working behind the scenes at Nasa in the 1960s. The story is set in Virginia where racial segregation meant that black and white Americans working for Nasa had to use different entrances, different toilets and different coffee pots. Read more

Open Banking: Soon to be a Costa Conversation

The business world moves fast, fintech possibly even faster, and every year there’s a raft of new technological developments and a whole new vocabulary to describe them. In 2016 we downloaded the Uber app, and we possibly dropped the term “unicorn” into conversation when we were talking about Uber, Snapchat and other hugely successful billion-dollar tech start-ups. Read more

Customer Empowerment & Concrete Lifejackets

In just over 12 months the whole landscape of banking will change forever. The new open banking standard, with its secure API, will make it possible for customers to access and share data that banks have historically held. Read more